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Controversial Florida state attorney Aramis Ayala receives noose in the mail

Orange/Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala, left, chats Monday, March 20, 2017 with State Attorney Brad King, District 5, the newly appointed prosecutor. [Red Huber | Orlando Sentinel/TNS]

Orange/Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala, left, chats Monday, March 20, 2017 with State Attorney Brad King, District 5, the newly appointed prosecutor. [Red Huber | Orlando Sentinel/TNS]

ORLANDO — An investigation is underway after a noose was mailed to the office of a Florida prosecutor who refuses to seek the death penalty in cases.

Orange County Sheriff's officials say the first letter arrived March 20 at the office of Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala.

The Orlando Sentinel reports a clerk saw a racist message scrawled on an envelope addressed to Ayala, who is Florida's first African-America state attorney. About a week later, the clerk found a second letter containing a noose made out of green twine and taped to a postcard.

BACKSTORY: Aramis Ayala: the Florida state attorney who refuses to pursue the death penalty

The sheriff's office redacted the contents of both letters.

Gov. Rick Scott reassigned 23 of Ayala's capital murder cases after she announced her refusal to seek the death penalty. Ayala is suing Scott, claiming he can't remove her from the cases.

Controversial Florida state attorney Aramis Ayala receives noose in the mail 04/21/17 [Last modified: Friday, April 21, 2017 9:12am]
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[SKIP O'ROURKE   |   Times file photo]